John Gordon Ross

A Man for All Reasons

John Gordon Ross header image 3

Language Stuff

Almost everyone uses language, so inevitably almost everyone thinks they are an expert in it. I don’t consider myself an expert, though most of my work requires at least language competence and sometimes actual skill, but I do follow the blogs featured on this feeds page.

(If you are wondering where the translation-related feeds have all gone, I have put them on their own page.)

Most of the blogs represented here are in English, most of the time, but don’t be surprised to find other languages used. Go with the flow – I occasionally find myself pleasantly surprised at how much I can grasp in languages I have never seen before.

Language On the Net

Urban Word of the Day » Nambia

Tuesday 26 September 8:00:00 UTC 2017

The world's top exporter of covfefe. Nambia's health system is increasingly self-sufficient. [Link]

Language Log » A brief history of "taking a knee"

Tuesday 26 September 4:50:17 UTC 2017

With dozens of NFL players "taking a knee" during the national anthem as a form of silent protest, the very phrase "take a knee" has been invested with new significance. "Take a knee" or "take the knee" now expresses solidarity against racial injustice and defiance against Donald Trump's attacks on protesting players. As the phrase dominates the headlines, it's worth … [Link]

Language Log » "National backbone"

Tuesday 26 September 0:40:59 UTC 2017

I. J. Khanewala writes: While visiting the tomb of the first emperor, I saw a sign in Mandarin which read minzu jiliang and translated as "National backbone". It left me quite mystified. Here's a photo of the sign: Source ("Utterly lost in translation"). Any idea what it could mean? Textual references to "mínzú jǐliang 民族脊梁" ("national backbone" — that's what … [Link]

languagehat.com » A Lexicographer’s Memoir.

Tuesday 26 September 0:31:13 UTC 2017

Adrienne Raphel reviews Kory Stamper’s Word by Word: The Secret Life of Dictionaries for the New Yorker; I’ll quote the start to give you an idea: One morning in 2001, Kory Stamper, a lexicographer for Merriam-Webster, arrived at work and was given a single word: “take.” She set to work hunting down examples of where the verb form of the … [Link]

Archive

18 Dec 2017  17 Dec 2017  16 Dec 2017  15 Dec 2017  14 Dec 2017  13 Dec 2017  12 Dec 2017  11 Dec 2017  10 Dec 2017  09 Dec 2017  08 Dec 2017  07 Dec 2017  06 Dec 2017  05 Dec 2017  04 Dec 2017  03 Dec 2017  02 Dec 2017  01 Dec 2017  30 Nov 2017  29 Nov 2017  28 Nov 2017  27 Nov 2017  26 Nov 2017  25 Nov 2017  24 Nov 2017  23 Nov 2017  22 Nov 2017  21 Nov 2017  20 Nov 2017  19 Nov 2017  18 Nov 2017  

No Comments

0 responses so far ↓

  • There are no comments yet...Kick things off by filling out the form below.

You must log in to post a comment.